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                                                                  爱赢娱乐国际_Button down corporate culture?

                                                                  作者:爱赢娱乐国际  发布时间:2018-05-13 06:02  点击:8193

                                                                  What is “button down corporate culture”? Button down?

                                                                  My comments:

                                                                  This means that you're not supposed to go to the office wearing a T-shirt.

                                                                  No shorts or slippers, either.

                                                                  That's all.

                                                                  I'm kidding. That's not all. Corporate culture is not just about dress codes but let's focus on the phrase button down at any rate.

                                                                  Button down, you see, refers to the act of buttoning up (yes, up will do, too) one's shirt, by passing the buttons through the button holes. If you wear a uniform or suit, then buttoning up will give you the formal and tidy look you're looking for.

                                                                  Unbuttoned?

                                                                  Well, that gives the look of someone who's listless, disorganized and unenergetic.

                                                                  See?

                                                                  Well, this is how button-down means literally. By extension, a button-down corporate culture refers to the business environment of a company that is very, well, business-like, highly organized, serious and competitive.

                                                                  “Culture” suggests that the company has been cultivating this type of environment or atmosphere for a long time and everybody is now familiar with and accustomed to it.

                                                                  Anyways, do not wear any sweat shirt, shorts or slippers to work, okay? While others in their work uniform look sharp and ready for work, you, say, wearing a turtle neck shirt and jeans, may give the wrong impression that you're just, well, fooling around.

                                                                  Steve Jobs wears a turtle neck and jean trousers, you point out.

                                                                  You're right, I say. So do not wear a turtle neck and jean trousers while at work. While others in their work uniform look sharp and ready for work, you may give the wrong impression that Steve Jobs is still alive.

                                                                  I mean, Steve Jobs is Steve Jobs. He's an exception that proves the rule. If you prove to be as exceptional as was the late Steve Jobs – may he now rest in peace (not competition) – you can wear anything you like.

                                                                  Alright?

                                                                  All right, let's read a few “button-down” examples in the media:

                                                                  1. It's always tough when you come across a movie in which there's no one to root for. Sometimes you find yourself rooting for the least insufferable of all of them, or, more often, hoping that all of the characters die in a bus accident, but usually you tend to gravitate towards the most charismatic and entertainingly cruel of the bunch. And in this particular movie, that's Stone, Edward Norton's cornrowed convict, who displays both willful ignorance and deadly cunning in his attempts to earn himself an early parole. Norton has always loved his accents, and his streets-of-Detroit delivery is funny at first, then sad, then just plain evil. The story of how he gets from here to there doesn't have a lot of twists in it, although it meanders quite a bit, but it serves to show off the new, entertaining character he's created.

                                                                  Stone's parole officer is Jack Mabry (Robert De Niro), who we learn right off the bat is a bit of a bastard. In flashback (as played by Dollhouse's resident mimic Enver Gjokaj), we see that he essentially blackmailed his wife into staying in their loveless marriage by threatening their daughter's life. Thirty years later, not much has changed, except that his wife (Frances Conroy) is a broken shell of a woman, who lives only for the Bible and her jigsaw puzzles. And Mabry, who's on the verge of retirement, seems to be a by-the-books stickler who doesn't brook any insolence or sex-talk from his cons. De Niro has played these emotionally distant characters before (most recently in Everybody's Fine), and his awkward interactions with the filter-free Stone are entertaining, especially once you realize how much Stone is testing him. Or is he? Norton goes back and forth between seeming genuine in his quest for redemption and rebirth and clearly looking for an angle, and I can't tell if it's a well-played game, two sides of his nature or simply inconsistency.

                                                                  Jovovich, playing Stone's wife Lucetta, is the third point in the triangle, a day care center employee whom Stone points at Mabry, knowing that her good-girl looks and raw sexuality will make Mabry putty in her hands. You initially question how much Stone knows about her methods of coercion, and how much of a pawn she is in all of this, but Jovovich plays the part differently depending on who she's with and what the scene hopes to accomplish. She succeeds in ensnaring Mabry, despite his button-down attitude and general self-loathing, and also in tipping off Mrs. Mabry that something weird is going on, driving her deeper into her misery. Conroy doesn't really have too much to do other than look defeated, but she's a somber presence in the background, and she's the only thing in the movie that says there are consequences to the game that's being played. Otherwise, it's just a standard love con, pulled by two bad people on a third, that doesn't really do too much to change up the story besides attempt to elevate it with a lot of talk about hearing God's plans for people. Although it would have been nice to, y'know, see it.

                                                                  - Stone: Sometimes Bad People Do Bad Things, TelevisionWithoutPity.com, October 22, 2010.

                                                                  2. Target Corp. may be known for its button-down culture, but now the company's office workers might show up in a pullover.

                                                                  The Minneapolis-based retailer relaxed its dress code this week, the Star Tribune reports.

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